New Group “Landowner Advocates of New York” Educates on Natural Gas and Private Property

A new group, the Landowner Advocates of New York, has formed out of the debate over natural gas development in New York in an effort to educate landowners and protect private property rights.

Marcellus Shale gas development (or hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”) is a hot subject amongst most New Yorkers. While the controversies hover around potential environmental impacts of the technology, the real issue is actually centered on private property rights.  This public debate on the permitted uses of private land is a manifestation of the struggle between affluent urbanites who want to dominate land use policies in the rural areas, versus farmers who want to use their land to make a living.

The rural areas of upstate New York have been hard hit by the financial crisis. Many of the farmers and rural population are at the verge of financial disaster. The development of shale gas would bring economic prosperity to these communities, and prevent the farmers from having to suffer the indignities of bank foreclosures or tax sales.

The urban elite, on the other hand, are more interested in preserving scenic beauty and tranquility of the rural areas than allowing the farmers to make a living.  Environmental preservation is a perfect excuse for imposing restrictions on private land use.  Accordingly, many rumors of pollution caused by drilling were propagated. As soon as one is debunked, another is invented. The objective is clear, to stop development of the mineral resources underneath these farmlands, thus preserving the wilderness, or “view shed” sought after by the urban elite.

Hydraulic fracturing is just one battlefront for the attack on private property rights.  The development restrictions placed by New York City on the private properties in the reservoir watershed areas has already exerted its damage on the local economy.  Similarly, private properties in the Adirondacks, and in the Delaware River Basin, are all suffering the same fate.

Based on careful studies conducted over the last five years, shale gas development is the safest and cleanest form of energy production we have today outside of hydro electricity.  Of the thousands of Superfund sites caused by various industrial activities, none were caused by hydraulic fracturing.  Of a million wells frac’ed to date, none has resulted in any frac fluid migration.  Case after case of false drilling pollution reports have been debunked by environmental agencies such as the EPA, the NYS DEC, and PA DEP, and the current presidential administration has declared hydraulic fracturing can be done safely.

Many may be surprised to learn that shale gas development has already helped reduce air pollution in the U.S. over the last three years. It has help reduce the heating bill of the average NYC resident significantly. It has created large numbers of jobs in Pennsylvania where drilling is allowed. New York State would benefit from such jobs creation and the added tax revenues.

To protect private property rights, and to educate the public on the truth behind shale gas development, the Landowner Advocates of New York was formed.  In addition to protecting the farmers right to use their land to make a living, we aim to correct the injustice of special interest groups using their political influence to zone out legitimate economic uses of the private properties of individuals, or declaring areas with environmental restrictions without just compensation.  Our mission is to uphold the US Constitution, as stated in the Fifth Amendment of the Bill of Rights, which stated:

“…nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.”

Comments

  1. fred jones says:

    I do sympathize with any hardship cases in NYS, for whatever reason they are in a financial bind, but let’s again be realistic here. Just because you signed a lease, does not mean the NG industry is going to drill on your land or anywhere near it, anytime soon if ever. They will drill where the best prospects are and where they can make a profit. Farmers have always had it rough…….long hours, subject to climate. Market swings for their products…..on and on. My dad farmed for 45 years and made it work some how without some dream of NG saving or subsidizing the business. Maybe some farms will be saved by NG development, but a lot will not because the NG companies will drill where THEY want to, not the lease holders. Plus, NYS is not all NG reserve friendly, like PA is, which harbors the mother-lode of NG. Southern NYS has the best prospects…….the rest of the state, little is any NG worth extracting.

    • tim kay says:

      fred, it is not only the money from royalties, it is the jobs that come with the industry that will help new york state. I witness this everyday here is PA. Our stores have more business, they have hired more workers, the agways have done great business suppling seed to replant the well pads and pipelines. The tractor sales have skyrocketed, the lease payments allowed the farmers to purchase new equipment. Are hardware stores are booming, again the lease money allowed them to make purchases for home improvements. My friends purchased additional dairy cows with their money. It is a trickle affect in all area’s of business, everything is doing better !!!!

  2. Lisa says:

    Another thing that alot people seem to leave out of the debate for energy is how it will help local education with alot of the money will go directly to school districts. The following Analysis of New York State’s four math regents and four science regents from 2010 indicate that on average more than one-quarter of New York students tested poorly in math and science.

    * In New York City, 24 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 39 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In Western New York, 23 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 16 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In Rochester/Finger Lakes, 25 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 15 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In Central New York, 24 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 19 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In the Southern Tier, 27 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 19 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In the Capital Region, 24 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 18 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In the North Country, 24 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 16 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * In the Hudson Valley, 26 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 17 percent score unsatisfactory in science.
    * On Long Island, 16 percent of high school students score unsatisfactory in math and 14 percent score unsatisfactory in science.

Speak Your Mind

*